Pre-Requisite Courses for Vet School

By Paige Roth

What is the number one reason veterinary schools reject applicants? Low GRE scores? Lousy GPAs? Minimal clinical experience? The real answer surprised me. According to VMCAS, “the applicant doesn’t meet the specific minimum requirements for that school.” My first response – how could anyone possibly screw that up? – soon gave way to some deeper criticism.

Most veterinary applicants are probably pretty smart people – or at least doggedly persistent – so there must be some reason pre-requisites threw them for a loop. In an effort to avoid the same fate, I took a closer look at the required courses.

For those of you just learning about pre-veterinary requirements (and if you aren’t, read ahead), each veterinary school has its own specific list of required courses. While there is certainly a good amount of overlap between the schools, the variation is just enough that students can’t blindly submit to any school that suits his or her fancy. The common courses tend to coincide with the pre-med list (read: all the chemistries, upper level biology, physics, statistics and calculus, a helping of humanities, and an English course for good measure.)

For a complete list of requirements for each school, click here.

But beyond those “core” classes, most schools have their own specific requirements. For example, some want genetics or microbiology, some want both, some want just upper level biology. Others require one semester of physics, more require two – but disagree on whether or not you need a lab. Animal nutrition is the famous added requirement (for schools like Texas A&M, Purdue and a few others). If you didn’t go to an agriculture school, finding this course can be a needle in a haystack. (Hint: Purdue offers the course online and most schools will accept that credit).

The bottom line: plan way ahead.

The best strategy is to start with your in-state school (because that’s where you have the best chance of admission) and design a plan of study to fulfill their requirements. Then sprinkle in a few more widely required courses (a microbiology or an animal nutrition) or classes to fulfill pre-requisites for a few of your other favorite schools. It feels a bit like putting the cart before the horse to write up your carefully selected list of schools before you even know if you can pass general chemistry, but that’s the nature of the beast.

Beware of credit hour requirements. Some schools require three, four, five, six or eight hours of physics (one semester or two? yay or nay on the lab? and I have no explanation for five). Because these requirements are generally based on the schools own curriculum, be sure you ask if your course counts. Same goes for courses with slightly different names (ex. my school’s public speaking course was called “human communication”). A few schools make this easy for you with lists of courses that count from other institutions. However, in most cases, your best bet is to contact the admissions team, unless you have a seasoned advisor.

Like many things in the veterinary application process, pre-requisites can seem a bit muddled. But take heed, it’s nothing a good spreadsheet, some direct emails and the occasional online course can’t fix.

Advertisements

Leave a Reply

Fill in your details below or click an icon to log in:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out / Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out / Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out / Change )

Google+ photo

You are commenting using your Google+ account. Log Out / Change )

Connecting to %s