Vet Student Volunteer Experience

By Paige Roth

Growing up, my family wasn’t big on volunteering. We always admired families that made a weekly appointment at their charity of choice, but skillfully justified our lack of participation with busy schedules or commitments that would one day make us more capable, generous philanthropists. During a particularly lean year I remember asking my mom why we didn’t volunteer more (read: why are we such lousy, selfish people), to which she good-naturedly responded, “I am my own charity.”

While I feel like most people my age pride themselves on over-committed schedules, keeping up the appearance of a break-neck pace to convey competence and possession of their life’s direction, my schedule really isn’t that busy. Even with a full time job and grad school, I find myself with infinitely more downtime than I ever had in undergrad. I immediately went in search of a vet-school-relevant way to fill it.

One of my short-term goals is to acquire more small animal experience. I was offered a position working as a kennel assistant, but couldn’t afford (financially or egotistically) to spend 40 hours a week cleaning cages for $8 an hour. I realized I could get similar experience volunteering at an animal shelter that could open the doors to positions like  a veterinary assistant – some clinics are willing to train these employees as long as they have some relevant animal experience.

Most animal shelters have organized volunteer programs that will work with your schedule – perfect for someone who works full time. I chose to volunteer at the Houston Humane Society. They had a very thorough volunteer training that covered not only the shelter’s policies and public health protocols, but also taught us basics of animal behavior and how to handle a variety of animals. The shelter also offers monthly courses for additional learning that can expose me to new subjects, like handling exotic animals, nutrition or grooming. Besides, it happens to be the shelter where we rescued Scout, so the least I can do is pay it forward.

After only a few hours of volunteering, I have learned a lot about the special health concerns pertaining to shelter medicine. As a dog walker and matchmaker for potential adopters, I have been exposed to a wide range of animals and can asses a variety of temperaments more quickly. Volunteering also means hanging out with other die-hard animal lovers, which makes it easy to stay motivated to keep checking vet school boxes.

I will continue to chronicle my journey and the various approaches I’m taking to fulfill my clinical hours. I would love to hear about your experience! What did you get out of volunteering? What tips do you have for vet students in need of hours?

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